6 Tips For Health-Conscious Meat Eaters - URBANETTE: Lifestyle Magazine & Blog

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6 Tips For Health-Conscious Meat Eaters

How meat affects your body, and what you can do to help your health.

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Like it or not, it’s time to face it — modern diets are changing, and many of us have already switched to plant-based and organic meals rather than traditional (and seriously unhealthy) American meat and potatoes. Get on the bandwagon or get diabetes. Or cancer. Or have a heart attack. #truth

6 Tips For Health-Conscious Meat Eaters

It’s not hard to see that the eco-movement has a strong foothold in the influencer crowd. A quick glance through some of the most followed accounts will show you that vegan is no longer just for hippies. And it’s no surprise given that A) being vegan is anti-aging, slimming and way healthier than any other way of eating, and B) it’s an essential step if humans expect to keep on living comfortable lives on Earth. Yes, really. Thankfully, more and more people in all demographics have realized this and are making an effort to be more ‘green,’ or environmentally conscious, and veganism is by far the fastest growing food movement out there.

In recent years, animal activists and environmentalists haven’t been shy when voicing their concerns over eating too much meat. In fact, studies conducted by the World Health Organization and the United Nations classify meat as a class-one carcinogen (meaning it’s as cancer-causing as cigarettes) and insist that we should minimize or eliminate our meat intake.

Studies also point out that by eating less meat, you’re not only benefiting your health, but reducing climate change. And for those of you in drought-ridden states, did you know that one pound of beef requires approximately 2,500 gallons of water to produce? That’s ten times the amount of water it takes to produce the same amount of soy. Oh yeah, and soy has about 50% more protein per pound. This means that producing meat is wasting a ton of our resources before it even becomes a usable food product. You can read more about the environmental effects in our article “Deciphering the Ethical Meat Trend“.

Over the years, we’ve learned that animals used for food are injected with tons of synthetic hormones. These fake hormones make cows produce more milk than they naturally would, and get pigs and chickens to balloon to twice the size they would be naturally. I don’t know about you, but that doesn’t sound like something I want to put in my body.

And it doesn’t stop there. The animals are kept in such dirty and cramped conditions that they’re given ‘preventative’ antibiotics to keep them from getting sick. The problem is that we end up ingesting these antibiotics so often that they stop being effective. On top of that, superbugs are being created in these factory farms that are so strong that no antibiotic can kill them. That means when we get sick, the antibiotics prescribed to us don’t work, and we either stay sick or die. (Hence, incurable gonorrhea. Eww.)

Here’s a quick and entertaining video, by Chipotle, that explains this with a bit more color:

6 Tips For Health-Conscious Meat Eaters

Your money pays for chickens to live like this

If all that wasn’t enough to scare us all off of meat, a hormone known as dioxin is found in many of our dairy and meat products. According to the researchers of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), those who consume even small amounts of dioxin from meat and dairy products have a shocking 17% higher, or 7 in 100, risk of suffering from cancer. And speaking of contamination, USDA researchers have found that eating chicken exposes you to arsenic. Even low doses of arsenic can dramatically increase the risk of cancer and birth defects.

6 Tips For Health-Conscious Meat Eaters

After their babies are taken from them, dairy cows are over-milked by machine three times per day, which is why humans ingest blood and puss in cow’s milk. Almond or organic soy milk is a yummy alternative.

In the book The China Study, their research proved that people who ate the most animal-based foods (whether organic or not) got the most chronic diseases and cancer, while people who ate the plant-based foods were the healthiest and tended to avoid disease. He also adds that a vegan diet can enable diabetic patients to go off their medication. He concluded that a good diet is the most powerful weapon we have against some of the most common diseases.

Think you can mitigate your risk by buying organic meat? Well, due to a lack of labeling regulations, it’s extremely hard to determine if the meat supplied in supermarkets and restaurants are either organic and free of chemicals — or laden with hormones, antibiotics and other unappetizing treatments. Despite its label, “organic” meat and dairy from cows is often treated with hormones. When inspectors in the European Union randomly sampled “hormone-free” beef from the U.S., they found that 12 percent of the meat had been treated with powerful hormones that are banned in Europe. Yikes!!

Here’s a wonderful video that Chipotle made to help people learn about the food industry, in an entertaining way:

OK, so those are some scary facts. Are you having a hard time skipping that juicy burger but still want to save the world, and keep your health in check? Here are some tips:

1. Moderate your meat and dairy. Go meatless, even if only for one day a week.

Many stars have pledged to go meatless even for just one or two days per week. Eating less meat will decrease your health problems, and decrease both animal suffering and greenhouse gasses. Try switching to almond, organic soy or flax milk – it’s much healthier, and better for the sustainability of the planet.6 Tips For Health-Conscious Meat Eaters

2. Eat more vegetables.

These include beans, grains (like quinoa), nuts and soy/tofu. Go organic as much as possible. Check nutritious faux-meat vegetarian and vegan recipes – some taste better than the original! Although humans do ingest some herbicides and pesticides from plant foods, scientists report that animal products are responsible for roughly 80 to 90 percent of dietary pesticide exposure.

3. Eat “greener” meat.

When you do eat meat, look for meat that has been grown organically, lean and unprocessed. There’s zero regulation on the word “Natural,” so make sure to look for “USDA Certified Organic”.

4.  Buy the right amount.

When buying meat, get small-sized portions. This will not only help you stick to a tight budget, but will also prevent wasting food or eating too much meat.

5.  Buy low-fat dairy products.

Most of the toxins are carried in animal fat. Get cheeses such as cream cheese, skim milk, and non-fat yogurt. Again, if it’s not organic, don’t eat it.

6. Speak out!

As a concerned citizen, you make the change by telling your local government to go environmentally friendly by raising livestock or pushing for nutritious meals for kids during their breaks.

 

So whether you are a vegetarian or a meat lover, minimizing meat can go a long way. Not only will you be doing your body a favor, but you’ll be giving the world a hug, too.

Read more: Deciphering the Ethical Meat and Sustainability Trend

A writer, artist and designer since she was young enough to put pencil to paper, Hilary spends most of her time in France, but still considers herself a New Yorker, and visits regularly. Hilary spent the past decade living in NYC and has traveled extensively around the world, looking for hot new topics, destinations, and brands to bring to Urbanette readers.

Reader Discussion: 47 Comments

  1. Lela House

    Those are very important tips for every human being life!

  2. Rosemary Robles

    Hands down, one of the most helpful posts I’ve read.

  3. Jessica Carlson

    I think the food we eat and why our body craves for those has nothing to do with our mental preference. Our body knows what we need, and it will always send signal to our brain. And what our bodies naturally crave is affected by a lot of factors like geographic location, or the weather conditions, among others.

    I have met someone who lives in a tropical country, and I learned that they like salty foods or maybe just a little bit more salty than what we are used to here in the west. I told him that too much salt is bad for the body. That person explained though that since they live in a tropical country where it’s hot all throughout, their bodies need salt to retain water. It’s not that they want salty food, but their bodies crave for it. And over the centuries, their ancestors have created dish that is suited for them.

    I think moderation is the key to a healthy diet and body. Natural and organic are the spare ones. And listening to the body’s cravings and not to our mental preference, which is highly influenced by advertisements, is the door.

  4. Jessica Carlson

    I think moderation is the key. And natural and organic are the spare ones. 🙂

  5. Roberta Bennett

    I’m a vegan, but I will not tell another what to eat, respect each others eating habits. All I would ask is that they eat with a conscience and be as kind as they can. 🙂

  6. Frances Seifert

    Hello, Hilary! Thanks for sharing! I always thought all meat was created equal, and am just now learning that is not true- the older I get , the more I realise I dont know.

  7. Kimberly Thompson

    I would love to only eat local and organic but where I live it poses two main problems: Availability and cost, when I win the lottery it will solve to affordability part, and then I can move somewhere to solve the availability part. Until then I can only try to make the best of it here LOL

    • Maybe there are organic food delivery services in your area? You may get lucky if you check online.

  8. Emma Blackwood

    Excellent article. Love it. I don’t have to change a thing! Real food for the win, but keep it as natural as possible and moderation. 🙂

  9. Catherine White

    Thank you for posting this article! I believe meat eating should be done at a low level like once a week or twice a month if at all. Support local farms and eat if you must grass fed, beef that is free range and not confined. Factory farming cows, dairy and beef is dangerous.

  10. Nicky Bryan

    Great article! I am not a meat eater, but I love how this article is different than all those many articles and people on the internet who depict meat eating as “only” bad, and I don’t believe that is true. My personal reason for not eating meat is simply that I don’t want to eat animals, because I love them. No health reasons at all. Nobody can eat completely healthy, there is always something, be it pesticides, risk for diseases, contamination, or whatever. It’s just the issue to choose which kind and level of “unhealthyness” you want.

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